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How to Find Cheap Translations with Consistent Vocabulary

Posted by STPL on April 11, 2013

“Consistent Vocabulary” means the words used by translator in the translation should be maintained the flow in the whole document. Its include Glossary terms, repetitions etc. Operator’s manuals, service manuals, etc. are the company’s technical documents which will be aware by anyone who is responsible for that purpose.

It has seen great progress in the standardization of vocabulary and phrasing in technical documents, because of the increasing use of translation memories. A translation memory (TM), is a database that stores “segments”, which have previously been translated. We may try some of the “on-line translation” systems available on the Internet.

In the “on-line translation” system, Translation memories have nothing to do. Translation memories are used to record accurate translations made by qualified translators. In the next time the TM will automatically produce the same translation for the segments. This helps in consistency of vocabulary and phrasing.

Translation memories are used by translation agencies and freelancers for two purposes:

1.         To save time and money in translation.

2.         In repeated sentences, to ensure the consistency of vocabulary.

Translation memories are mainly used by freelance translators to save time and to produce standardized translations. For the same purpose, Translation Agency were started to use translation memory systems. This is reduced cost of translation sometimes, since three categories of translation are used:

•Perfect match (when the translation of the sentence already existed in the TM, the computer translates the sentence automatically) this helps to reduce the word count of the documents and for this category is often paid at 20% or 30% of “per word” price to translators.

•Fuzzy match (when the translation of sentence is almost the same as a sentence in the TM; in this case the translator has to check it for differences in the two sentences). This is often paid at 50% or 60% of “per-word” price.

•No match (when there is no such match sentences in the translation memory). This is paid at 100% of “per-word” price.

By using of TM of various tools we would maintain a consistent vocabulary in translated documents, with cheap rate.

In the world, among some of the companies it became usual to work with translation agencies who kept such memories on their behalf. Translation memories are now used by the translation agencies for the medium and small customers. The main advantage, to maintain a consistent vocabulary in the documents is to get the quality of that particular document. A company working with translation agencies sometimes enjoys the low cost for their translation by using this tools and techniques.

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Linguistic issues with Translation

Posted by STPL on January 21, 2010

One of the distinctive properties of translation is creativity, by which we mean the ability of native speakers of a language to produce and understand new forms in their language. Even though creativity is most apparent when it comes to translation and sentence formation, it is also manifest in our lexical knowledge, where new words are added to our mental lexicon regularly.

Translation is always done in clear and grammatically correct language. Whether it is Hindi, English or any other language, it should be formed grammatically correct as well as grammatically sound. As an English to Hindi translator in Somya Translators Pvt Ltd. I would like to share some of my view on the issues we face while translating from native language to different and vise-a-versa. Many times it had been noticed that we get so involve and used to technical translation that we forget that translation is not about translating every word, instead its all together a business of forming a whole new sentence from one language to other language conveying the same meaning. As I am not much aware of any other language I can only judge two languages, i.e. of course Hindi and English. Sometimes I do find mistranslations in articles translated in Hindi, which is probably due to insufficient knowledge on the part of the native language, but it is very rare, and I am always surprised when this happens. They do not

really contain mistranslations based on misunderstanding of the original language and the technical terms are usually correct, but the target language is sometime so bad that I have to read the original text at least twice before I can figure out what the translated text means.

One of the reasons behind this is the phonological, alphabetical difference between Hindi and English and also the preposition and postposition difference in them. The Devangari script employed by Hindi contains both vowels (10) and consonants (40). Hindi is highly phonetic; i.e. the pronunciation of new words can be reliably predicted from their written form. This is in strong contrast to English. Conversely, it results in mispronouncing words that people first encounter in writing. In Hindi, objects have genders. For instance, a book is feminine and a house is masculine. Hindi uses a different word order than English. Since grammar is quite difficult with two genders, laypeople make mistakes in that regard. Also in Hindi Postpositions are used instead of Prepositions.

Translators should be aware of the fact that incorrect comprehension of a text considerably decreases the quality of the translation.

Finding solutions to dilemmas is a constant in the work of the translator. This includes reading comprehension strategies for translation (underlining words, detecting translation difficulties, contextualizing lexical items, analyzing them, and so on.)

Translators should also be aware that meaning is not only conveyed by words. Hence adequate decoding and re-coding of nomenclatures, figures, tables and charts; standardized terms, acronyms, toponyms, etc. is a matter that must be properly considered.

Last, but not least, translators should observe that the essence, in terms of meaning and sense, register and style, etc., and the lay out of the original text, in terms of format, i.e. sources, paragraphs, indentation, columns, tables, etc., is properly adhered to in the translated unit.

If followed properly this can and will certainly help in providing the best translation in business.

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Difference between Hindi and Urdu

Posted by STPL on January 21, 2010

Linguists think of Hindi and Urdu as the same language, the difference being that Hindi is written in Devanagari and draws vocabulary from Sanskrit, while Urdu is written in Persian script and draws on Persian and Arabic.

Hindi is closely related to Urdu, the main language of Pakistan, which is written with the Arabic script, and linguists consider Standard Hindi and Standard Urdu to be different formal registers both derived from the Khari Boli dialect, which is also known as Hindustani.

The separation is largely a political one; before the partition of India into India and Pakistan, spoken Hindi and Urdu were considered the same language, Hindustani.

Apart from the difference in writing systems, the other main difference between Hindi and Urdu is that Hindi contains more vocabulary from Sanskrit, while Urdu contains more vocabulary from Persian.

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