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IMPORTANCE OF TAMIL TRANSLATION IN BUSINESS PERSPECTIVE

Posted by STPL on April 6, 2013

Tamil Language:

Tamil is a classic ancient language belongs to Dravidian language group. Over 80 million people speak Tamil Language. Most of them are from south India, and also express some decent numbers in Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Singapore, Canada and etc.

Tamil Translation:

            On important thing to explain anything to anyone is in their mother language, it will be easier to catch and understand. Same applicable for Tamil also, if contents available in Tamil it will be more attractive. In native Tamil palaces most of the school studies offered only in Tamil. So, maximum of people are able to understand Tamil instead of content available in any other language. Now higher studies are also available in Tamil medium. May be in future this will make a huge demand for Tamil contents translated from other languages.

Translation Quality:

            Anyone can do Translation but only few who know the language pairs as well as able to understand domain of content can give perfect translation. This law applicable for all languages but in Tamil we have to follow some other points. The main point is to understand the difference between Centhamil (Literal) and Kodunthamil (Speak) with dialects words. Usually in Tamil writing we have to follow Centhamil. Also the important to target people in which place the content is going like Sri Lanka, Malaysia etc. In native based Tamil translation no need to follow dialects words but exceptional for some cases on localization.

Rules for Tamil Translation:

  • Must have knowledge in usage of Tamil words. Because maximum cases you can translate a single word into many forms. So, you need the knowledge to pick the right word in right place.
  • Understanding the domain (Content Type). It will help to add the right words on translation. Also it will help for better translation.
  • Considering the native target people. It will help for localizing the content to convey the exact meaning easily.
  • And very important rule is in which medium the translation going to publish. It is like a book, electronic devices, notice, or papers. It will help you to take the style of translation.
  • Targeting specific group people. E.g. If the content goes for Agriculture then you need to follow the style which is more easy for farmers. 

 

 

Tamil translation Importance in Business Perspectives:

 

Before 90’s some translation happened in Tamil language by Government documents and Literature field. After that things changed, now a day due to globalization and growing of technology the world market extended to all over world.

Native Tamil places having the good opportunity for all products. In that the product description available in Tamil, Peoples can easily understand about it results selling will increase easily. For some organizations understands the linguistic part of their products, so they implemented and start gives advertisement notices, user guides in Tamil. Not only product details also like notifications by banks, software tutorials, software user guides also providing by some to better communications and knowledge.

 

Now, most of the localization industry also required for translation, interpretation and other linguistic operations. In future it will increase due to the decent percentage of consumer market in Tamil native. Especially on technical Translation Services will grow more due to advancing technology and increasing of people to learn such items.   

 

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Translator: A Puppet or Einstein!

Posted by STPL on March 23, 2010

Is a translator a puppet or an einstein? As a translator do you want to be counted as a person who solely follows the glossary and terminology and give damn about the other things and make the translation dreadfully prosaic or we want to be simply like Shakespeare, The Master of Words!

In my opinion a translator should be a mixture of both Einstein and Shakespeare i.e. he should be inventive like Einstein and innovative like Shakespeare.

Since scope of translation is vast and it is the requirement of almost every single sector, from business catalogue, pamphlets, manuals to games guide, movie, subtitling etc., thus it is very important to maintain the rhyme and essentials of the project from beginning till the end, and still make it easy for the user to read. Most translation when taken out of context becomes more difficult to understand. It’s not the translators fault but he is certainly the one to be blamed for. It’s not his fault as he was just following the basic translation rules but his fault is that he only followed the glossary and ignored what the source is actually expressing. Sometimes some words and phrases are used as a references for which we should write appropriate word and phrases that convey the same meaning in target language. For this one has to be either sensible enough to put the suitable phrase in target language or skilled enough to play with words and form the same meaning with the same expression.

As a translator, we are bound with so many norms and rules like ‘following this and that’; which is necessary of course but the question is till what extend… Because of this incertitude, a question always come to my mind that when bounded with the rules, does a translator ever get the opportunity to open up and show his creative and ingenious professional side!

The answer is creativity can never be caged. If you have creativity and know to use it with words then one day it will surely going to get noticed. But, it’s up to you and will always be, whether you want to use it with your creativity and beautify it or let the machines overpower your sensibility.

All you need to remember is…

Never let anything prevent you from doing what is right…

This quote should not be taken as a kick against action but should be taken as a simple truth that rights can never be wrong. Of course to maintain consistency throughout the project you got to follow glossary and terminology etc. But if you feel that you can give it a better shape, even if you have to include words not present in source or exclude words from source, then why not. And, if the creativity has been used in the right manner without hindering the glossary, then Bingo!! You Got it.

Translation is just as creative as writing a film script, rather than making it complicated for us, all we need to do is to play with words rather than becoming a puppet of glossaries. Remember we created the glossaries and we can always make it work our way.

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Meaning of Translation

Posted by STPL on March 23, 2010

Translation is, above all, an activity that aims at conveying meaning or meanings of a given-linguistic discourse from one language to another, rather than the words or grammatical structures of the original. The meaning of a given word or set of words is best understood as the contribution that word or phrase can make to the meaning or function of the whole sentence or linguistic utterance where that word or phrase occurs. The meaning of a given word is governed not only by the external object or idea that particular word is supposed to refer to, but also by the use of that particular word or phrase in a particular way, in a particular context, and to a particular effect.

Translation requires a high standard of knowledge of a language and a meticulous approach to words and processing text. Many specialise in specific fields such as legal or medical texts. Translators also usually only translate into their native language. A translator would need a high degree of fluency to translate out of their native language, as no matter how long you’ve lived in a country, there will always be forms of the language you don’t know.

Use of Dictionary

As a language learner you should never be far from a good dictionary. Learn how to use it properly and you will enrich your language skills. Besides using your dictionary as a quick reference book for words you’re not sure about, use it as a source of increasing your knowledge of how your new language works. This doesn’t mean you need to read it from cover to cover. However you should understand how your bi-lingual dictionary works.

Familiarise yourself with the list of abbreviations usually found at the front of the dictionary. You should also find grammar tips, verb tables, cultural notes, pronunciation tips, numbers, weights and measures and times and dates. Knowing how to find these quickly can be very useful to the language learner.

In the middle of a good language dictionary there is often a section on common language phrases. This will be split into categories such as: job applications, commercial correspondence, opinions, likes and dislikes, the telephone and e-mail. Use this section to improve your language skills. Many people don’t even know it’s there!

Difficulties with translation

Despite having the support of a good dictionary, it’s always a good idea to try and ‘stretch’ your language skills. When you come across a word you don’t know don’t automatically turn to the dictionary. By all means use it as a back up to check words, but first of all try and get the meaning of the word.

Look at the whole context of the paragraph and see if it gives you any clues. Consider the tense of the word. It may be a familiar verb in a tense you don’t recognise. Try and take a step back and look at the meaning of the text you are trying to translate, to see if the unfamiliar words fall into place. This method doesn’t always work, but when it does it’s much more satisfying then turning the pages of a dictionary.

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Tips for Translation

Posted by STPL on March 23, 2010

There is no need to explain what translation means in our everyday non-professional understanding. It is a process when a text – be it oral or written – created in one language is transferred into another language. But translation has never been just a word for word substitution – it is a difficult and creative process that requires real professionals with a wide experience in Translation Industry. It is the language differences that made people resort to this hard yet vitally important job and made the translation itself one of the oldest occupations in the world. Different cultures, mentalities, levels of development, traditions – all of them come forward when a need arises to translate. It is easy to make oneself lost in this ever-changing world of words and meanings.

Many people believe that Translation is an easy thing and all you have to do is to change words from the source text into the equivalent words of a target text. However, this is not true since some phrases, if translated literally, would make no sense.

Translation is a very complicated process which has to consider many factors – the genre and the style of the original text, the translator’s competence, and the timeline allocated to the project and many more. There are a great number of useful translation tips available online and offline, yet every translator have their own reliable methods and techniques, built on expertise and time. Here, are few of the most essential translation tips that can come in handy both for the oral translation and the written translation.

Oral Translation Tips

Interpreting – simultaneous, consecutive and whispering – is considered to be the most difficult type of translation. To achieve great results in this domain, an interpreter is expected to have a high level of competence in different areas, to understand and critically analyse the translated information, to know how to highlight the key elements in the text, to constantly enrich their professional vocabulary, etc. The personal features of an interpreter – such as a quick reaction, clear articulation, and bright mind – are also of great importance.

The most essential interpretation tips are as follows:

a) In advance familiarize yourself with the topic of the speech.

b) Note down main points of the speech – it will help you when interpreting.

c) Translate and clarify the meaning of special terms and key words prior to   interpreting.

d) Establish friendly relations between you and the speaker at a consecutive translation.

e) Remember to pronounce words distinctly and clearly.

f) Produce a brief summary at the end of the speech – it helps to clarify conclusions.

g) React quickly and be ready to work under pressure.

h) Enjoy what you are doing – there won’t be a second chance.

i)Transmit a clear message to the target audience.

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Machine Translation

Posted by STPL on January 23, 2010

“A renewed international effort is gearing up to design computers and software that smash language barriers and create a borderless global marketplace.”

Machine translation (MT) is a procedure whereby a computer program analyzes a source text and produces a target text without further human involvement. In point of fact, machine translation typically does involve human intervention, in the form of pre-editing and post-editing. An exception to that rule might be, e.g., the translation of technical specifications (strings of technical terms and adjectives), using a dictionary-based machine-translation system.

So far, machine translation a major goal of natural-language processing has met with limited success. A November 6, 2007, example illustrates the hazards of uncritical reliance on machine translation.

Machine translation has been brought to a large public by tools available on the Internet, such as Google, Babylon, Wikipedia etc. These tools produce a “gisting translation” a rough translation that, with luck, “gives the gist” of the source text.

With proper terminology work, with preparation of the source text for machine translation (pre-editing), and with re-working of the machine translation by a professional human translator (post-editing), commercial machine-translation tools can produce useful results, especially if the machine-translation system is integrated with a translation-memory or globalization-management system.

In regard to texts with limited ranges of vocabulary and simple sentence structure (e.g., weather reports), machine translation can deliver results that do not require much human intervention to be useful. Also, the use of a controlled language, combined with a machine-translation tool, will typically generate largely comprehensible translations.

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Quality Ways For the Translation

Posted by STPL on January 23, 2010

As all the countries of the world, to fulfill there financial need, coming together irrespective of there political boundaries and, to help people come together and carry same perspective for one target, these countries are taking help of translation to let the world know about there historical articles, scriptures and texts.

Technique can also not ignore the need importance of translation today. Especially, as in current times its position and situation clearly shows that its field will keep on growing. Because of this, many people are making translation as there professional.

But translation is not a piece of cake… It’s a process of dedication and complete lexical knowledge. As far as those people are concerned, who think that mere knowledge of some languages can make it easy to translate a language from another language, they are not correct. As the transferring a life from its habitat, effects on its efficiency and habits, as translation of a creation of a language definitely affects its original existence. Most of the time, is has been seen that, some translation of a creation is very awkward.

For removing this type of problem here are some step must be taken:-

First of all, we should well understand the topic or document is being given for translation. Doing many kind of research, can be helped to understand the sole of the source. After understanding the sole, we can do the translation very much closer to existing translation. Then we can start the Translation. After completing the translation, we must re-review our own translation. As we know Human being is the statue of mistakes. That’s why it is absolutely sure that we can do mistakes, and by this way we can remove these kind mistakes by our self.

Secondly, we should send our translation to the Editor, for editing and Review. It will bring upon qualitative changes in your translation by removing grammatical and stylistically errors.

After this, we must send the edited and reviewed translation to the reviewer for final review. It is very much important role in translation. Because the reviewer find out the miner mistakes, preferential changes from the translation.

After the completion of above steps, we can say the translation has been completed. But even we must send the file to the Final revision and detailed explanation. So that we can be satisfied with the translation and further argues.

Following these steps while translation, Improve the Quality and Sole of an Existing Creation and can be satisfied with Our Own work.

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Perspective of IT and Telecommunication Translation

Posted by STPL on January 22, 2010

Present Time is the time of Globalization. In the current scenario every country is carrying equal level of perception and thinking about its culture, state and business. Today one’s loss or profit is connected to others loss or profit. One of the biggest examples of this is Economic Showdown. At this time, every country need to share there information, culture, and past experiences with another country. It’s not only benefited for their business but also it is beneficial for future steps of development and mutual growth.

Currently, there are many types of translation, but the scope of technical translation is becoming so popular that it seem difficult to assess the border.

For this new software and new telecom device is being developed constantly. But the native people of other country can not understand the functionality of that device, machine. To solve it we need to render the information from one technical language to other technical language. It’s called IT/Telecom translation.

In this domain of translation there are more fields. Very first is the Hardware, It means that, when exploring any Hardware device, like HP LaserJet, other people may find it difficult to understand the ways of operating the device, most of the time they need the manual in their native language. Hence to make the manual and operating methods readable and understandable Hardware translation is needed.

Second one is Software translation, its purpose of translation is also same as above, but Web Site Localization is also an important pillar of IT/Telecom Translation Industry. As today, the use of internet is growing by the speed of light; hence giving a broad scope of exposure. For the same, every company is making their web site, and making it localized in local language. So that, people of any country know and understand them. By this, it becomes the fastest way to spread information of the company.

And the last field of this domain is Telecom Industry. In this part the content and manuals of device like Mobile, Fax machine, and Wireless get translated. Today these devices are being counted as one of the important need of human being. Irrespective of there knowledge of English or any other foreign language, they use it. But to use them, they need to understand the methods provided in the manual, and for the same they Telecom Translation is coming in use.

To make the translation easier and approachable there are many Company, Agency and Freelancers handling the translations of these fields. And Somya Translators Pvt Ltd is one of the solutions provider for all of these translation issue.

Somya Translators Pvt. Ltd. is team of Translators .We are a Translators from india Provides Translation services,Translation services india,Proffesional languages Translation and Translation Agency.For more Information Plz visit our Website here :- http://www.somyatrans.com

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Translation process

Posted by STPL on January 21, 2010

Before I brief you the process of translation, we should first understand the meaning of translation. Translation is the process to render written or spoken source language texts to equivalent written or spoken target language texts.

At the first glance, as per the definition, it seem very easy and quick process, but in reality it is as complicated and methodological. When a project come for translation it has to go through several stages before it finally reaches to the translator. Even then it goes through more stages till its final delivery. This entire process can be sum up as The Translation Process.

The translation process includes decoding the meaning of the source text, and re-encoding or translating this meaning in the target language. Behind this simple process lies various activities like checking grammar, syntax, idioms, semantics, and the like of the source language and also the culture of its speakers. It is necessary that the translator’s knowledge of the target language is more important than his knowledge of the source language.

The process, which is usually followed by all to ensure a well written, accurate translation:

The document that is to be translated is assigned to a person who is well versed with the native language is that which the document is being translated into. The document is edited by a person who is fluent in both the target and source languages. Accuracy, grammar, spelling and writing style are all checked in the editing stage. The document is proofread by a person who is fluent in both languages. It is also necessary to check spelling and layout. Finally, before the document goes to the client, the document is further rechecked to ensure that the translation is correct, there is no missing text or texts and the layout is perfect.

There are also some particular problems in the translation process: problems of ambiguity, problems that originate from structural and lexical differences between languages and multiword units like idioms and collocations. Another problem would be the grammar because there are several constructions of grammar poorly understood, in the sense that it isn’t clear how they should be represented, or what rules should be used to describe them. The words that are really hard to translate are frequently the small, common words, whose precise meaning depends heavily on context. Besides, some words are untranslatable when one wishes to remain in the same grammatical category. The question of whether particular words are untranslatable is frequently debated.

Few measures can be taken to avoid and produce the best translation. It is important that translators are familiar with the product they are translating and also with the tools they are using. The translation process is not the replacement of one word with another, but the formation of concepts in another language. Thus, each translator should have equipment and knowledge compatible with the language being translated. Translation guidelines and instructions should be provided to ensure correct translation. To ensure accurate translation, terminology glossary should also be provided to the translators.

To ensure quality we must follow this process and safety measures. After all it’s the quality and gaining clients trust that matters.

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Linguistic issues with Translation

Posted by STPL on January 21, 2010

One of the distinctive properties of translation is creativity, by which we mean the ability of native speakers of a language to produce and understand new forms in their language. Even though creativity is most apparent when it comes to translation and sentence formation, it is also manifest in our lexical knowledge, where new words are added to our mental lexicon regularly.

Translation is always done in clear and grammatically correct language. Whether it is Hindi, English or any other language, it should be formed grammatically correct as well as grammatically sound. As an English to Hindi translator in Somya Translators Pvt Ltd. I would like to share some of my view on the issues we face while translating from native language to different and vise-a-versa. Many times it had been noticed that we get so involve and used to technical translation that we forget that translation is not about translating every word, instead its all together a business of forming a whole new sentence from one language to other language conveying the same meaning. As I am not much aware of any other language I can only judge two languages, i.e. of course Hindi and English. Sometimes I do find mistranslations in articles translated in Hindi, which is probably due to insufficient knowledge on the part of the native language, but it is very rare, and I am always surprised when this happens. They do not

really contain mistranslations based on misunderstanding of the original language and the technical terms are usually correct, but the target language is sometime so bad that I have to read the original text at least twice before I can figure out what the translated text means.

One of the reasons behind this is the phonological, alphabetical difference between Hindi and English and also the preposition and postposition difference in them. The Devangari script employed by Hindi contains both vowels (10) and consonants (40). Hindi is highly phonetic; i.e. the pronunciation of new words can be reliably predicted from their written form. This is in strong contrast to English. Conversely, it results in mispronouncing words that people first encounter in writing. In Hindi, objects have genders. For instance, a book is feminine and a house is masculine. Hindi uses a different word order than English. Since grammar is quite difficult with two genders, laypeople make mistakes in that regard. Also in Hindi Postpositions are used instead of Prepositions.

Translators should be aware of the fact that incorrect comprehension of a text considerably decreases the quality of the translation.

Finding solutions to dilemmas is a constant in the work of the translator. This includes reading comprehension strategies for translation (underlining words, detecting translation difficulties, contextualizing lexical items, analyzing them, and so on.)

Translators should also be aware that meaning is not only conveyed by words. Hence adequate decoding and re-coding of nomenclatures, figures, tables and charts; standardized terms, acronyms, toponyms, etc. is a matter that must be properly considered.

Last, but not least, translators should observe that the essence, in terms of meaning and sense, register and style, etc., and the lay out of the original text, in terms of format, i.e. sources, paragraphs, indentation, columns, tables, etc., is properly adhered to in the translated unit.

If followed properly this can and will certainly help in providing the best translation in business.

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Hindi, the fourth most spoken language

Posted by STPL on January 19, 2010

Hindi is the fourth most spoken language in the world. About 500 million people speak Hindi, in India and abroad, and the total number of people who can understand the language may be 800 million. The constitution of India (Article 343) recognizes Hindi as the official language of India. Hindi is also the main language in many states of India such as Haryana, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal/ Uttarakhand, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Himachal Pradesh. It is spoken by more than 487 million people in the world. The other dialects of Hindi are Brajbhasha, Bundeli, Awadhi, Marwari, Maithili, and Bhojpuri, to name only a few.

Total speakers: 487 million

Official language of: India

Statistics:

India – 363,839,000
Bangladesh – 346,000
Belize – 8, 455
Botswana – 2000
Germany – 24,500
Nepal – 170, 997
New Zealand – 11,200
Philippines – 2,415
Singapore – 5000
South Africa – 890, 292
Uganda – 147, 000
United Kingdom – 243 000
USA – 26,253
Yemen – 65, 000

Total – 487,000,000

Clearly there’s only one Hindi language, but as in most countries different sections of the population will have different phrases and use of language.

Hindi can be traced back to as early as the seventh or eighth century. The dialect that has been chosen as the official language is Khariboli in the Devnagari script. Other dialects of Hindi are Brajbhasa, Bundeli, Awadhi, Marwari, Maithili and Bhojpuri.

It was in the 10th century that authentic Hindi poetry took its form and since then it has been constantly modified. History of Hindi literature as a whole can be divided into four stages: Adikal (the Early Period), Bhaktikal (the Devotional Period), Ritikal (the Scholastic Period) and Adhunikkal (the Modern Period).

Hindi is an Indo-Aryan language with about 487 million speakers. It is one of the official languages of India and is the main language used in the northern states of Rajasthan, Delhi, Haryana, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand and Bihar, and is spoken in much of north and central India alongside other languages such as Punjabi, Gujarati, Marathi or Bengali. In other parts of India, as well as in Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan, Hindi is understood. In Fiji people of Indian origin speak Hindi, and in some areas the Fijian people also speak it.

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